In general, I think we need to move away from the premise that being a good person is a fixed immutable characteristic and shift towards seeing being good as a practice. And it is a practice that we carry out by engaging with our imperfections. We need to shift towards thinking that being a good person is like being a clean person. Being a clean person is something you maintain and work on every day.We don’t assume ‘I am a clean person therefore I don’t need to brush my teeth.’ When someone suggests to us that we have something stuck in our teeth we don’t say to them ‘What do you mean I have something stuck in my teeth—but I’m a clean person?!’

Jay Smooth in his TED speech “how I learned to stop worrying and love discussing race” (via tropicanastasia)

Jay Smooth almost always a reblog

(via unrational)

Dude nailed it. We all need to work at being good. Even if we think we are.

(via jasmined)

This applies to so much

(via seanbonner)

(via yttriumrapier)

cigarxt:

similar here

cigarxt:

similar here

(Source: anaisthemermaid, via lola-pastel)

just gotta ounce in the mail..

just gotta ounce in the mail..

(Source: oksux, via g-y-p-s-y-h-e-a-r-t-s)

zodiacchic:

ZodiacChic Post:Pisces

zodiacchic:

ZodiacChic Post:Pisces

zodiacchic:

ZodiacChic Post:Pisces

zodiacchic:

ZodiacChic Post:Pisces

femalerolemodel:


Cat Calling

femalerolemodel:

Cat Calling

(via c-ptn)

Is that supposed to be cocaine on the end? looks like feta to me…

Is that supposed to be cocaine on the end? looks like feta to me…

(Source: arisjerome, via c-ptn)

goingforpicture:

goforlocs:

Reblog if you agree!

Always reblog. 

not my area of expertise, but hilarious nonetheless.

goingforpicture:

goforlocs:

Reblog if you agree!

Always reblog.

not my area of expertise, but hilarious nonetheless.

(via whatisit-emily)

get to know me meme: [4/7] movies » mary poppins

What did I tell ya? There’s the whole world at your feet. And who gets to see it, but the birds, the stars, and the chimney sweeps.

(via rantrittojr)

almost-never-lively:

officialwumbo:

agirlnamedagnes:

This is what my husband and I purchased at the grocery store the other day.

We don’t have kids.

We are adults. We pay bills.
And drink water from a whale.

Money whale spent 

get out

(via rantrittojr)

jequitakoyama:

sixpenceee:

A team of scientists at the University of Southampton in the UK has just finished a four-year study of 2,060 people who experienced cardiac arrests at 15 hospitals across the UK, the US, and Austria. The researchers found that 40 percent of them felt ‘aware’ for the period of time that they were declared clinically dead. The medical staff at the hospitals successfully restarted their hearts so they could live to tell the tale. 
One man participating in the study described the feeling that he was watching his treatment from the corner of the room, while a female participant was able to recount exactly the actions of the nursing staff that resurrected her over a three-minute period. She could even very accurately describe the sound of the machines that surrounded her ‘dead’ body.
 “We know the brain can’t function when the heart has stopped beating, but in this case conscious awareness appears to have continued for up to three minutes into the period when the heart wasn’t beating, even though the brain typically shuts down within 20 to 30 seconds after the heart has stopped,” Sam Parnia, the study leader said.
 “The man described everything that had happened in the room, but importantly, he heard two bleeps from a machine that makes a noise at three-minute intervals. So we could time how long the experienced lasted for. He seemed very credible and everything that he said had happened to him had actually happened,” said Parnia
Not all of the people who survived the ordeal recalled some sort of experience in clinical death, perhaps because the medication they were given was messing with their brain function. Certain trends emerged from the 40 percent that did. One in five reported feeling peaceful, and a third said they felt time either speed up or slow down. Some described bright lights, others described feeling detached from their bodies. Some felt scared that they were drowning.
Of course, any research into what actually goes on after death will always be controversial, due to the enormous difficulties in gathering enough evidence to support much of anything that’s scientifically sound, but studies like this are at least an intriguing starting point. 
The study was published in the journal Resuscitation. (News Article)

CoooolOne can only wish

Wow

jequitakoyama:

sixpenceee:

A team of scientists at the University of Southampton in the UK has just finished a four-year study of 2,060 people who experienced cardiac arrests at 15 hospitals across the UK, the US, and Austria. The researchers found that 40 percent of them felt ‘aware’ for the period of time that they were declared clinically dead. The medical staff at the hospitals successfully restarted their hearts so they could live to tell the tale. 

One man participating in the study described the feeling that he was watching his treatment from the corner of the room, while a female participant was able to recount exactly the actions of the nursing staff that resurrected her over a three-minute period. She could even very accurately describe the sound of the machines that surrounded her ‘dead’ body.

 “We know the brain can’t function when the heart has stopped beating, but in this case conscious awareness appears to have continued for up to three minutes into the period when the heart wasn’t beating, even though the brain typically shuts down within 20 to 30 seconds after the heart has stopped,” Sam Parnia, the study leader said.

 “The man described everything that had happened in the room, but importantly, he heard two bleeps from a machine that makes a noise at three-minute intervals. So we could time how long the experienced lasted for. He seemed very credible and everything that he said had happened to him had actually happened,” said Parnia

Not all of the people who survived the ordeal recalled some sort of experience in clinical death, perhaps because the medication they were given was messing with their brain function. Certain trends emerged from the 40 percent that did. One in five reported feeling peaceful, and a third said they felt time either speed up or slow down. Some described bright lights, others described feeling detached from their bodies. Some felt scared that they were drowning.

Of course, any research into what actually goes on after death will always be controversial, due to the enormous difficulties in gathering enough evidence to support much of anything that’s scientifically sound, but studies like this are at least an intriguing starting point. 

The study was published in the journal Resuscitation. (News Article)

Cooool
One can only wish

Wow